Sunday, November 18, 2012

Ding Dong the Twinkie is Dead

The events of this past week have Sno Balled rather quickly and Suzie Q is still in a state of shock. Teamsters are calling the striking union a bunch of Ding Dongs and Ho Hos.





The Shelf Life Of A Twinkie Is Only About 25 Days

It's a common urban legend that the "golden sponge cake with creamy filling" has an absurdly long shelf life--in Disney's WALL-E, a Twinkie is found completely undecayed, 700 years after the Earth is deemed uninhabitable. And once, a science teacher in Maine kept an unwrapped Twinkie atop his chalkboard for 30 years, telling the Associated Press, "It's rather brittle, but if you dusted it off, it's probably still edible."

But what's the actual shelf life of a Twinkie? Only about 25 days, according to Theresa Cogswell. In 2005, she told the Washington Post, "You can eat older Twinkies, but they're just not as good as when they're fresh. Then they're awesome." Still, as the newspaper noted, 25 days is still pretty darn impressive for a "baked" good, but then again, there's no dairy-based ingredients in them, only flour, sugar, oil, eggs and chemicals we can't pronounce. 



Opera singer Hai-Ting Chinn sings the ingredients of a Twinkie

Twinkie the Kid
One third of the trinity of Hostess snack cake mascots, he’s the rootin’, tootin’ crème-filled cowboy, ready to save the day and offer up a tasty Twinkie to anyone who needs a little yummy goodness in their lives. Let’s take a look back at this memorable mascot that has graced every box of Twinkies (and more than a few television commercials) since the 70s.
Along with his confectionary comrades, Captain Cupcake and Fruit Pie the Magician, Twinkie the Kid has been spreading the word about Hostess snacks since he first appeared in 1971. With a 10-gallon hat, kerchief and cowboy boots, he has saved the day ever since, most often with his formidable lasso skills
Granted, a bit of controversy has always surrounded “The Kid,” as some consider it less than wholesome to use cartoon characters to make junk food appealing to children. But it takes more than a little bad press to bring someone like Twinkie the Kid down. His legendary sweet disposition and legacy as a wrangler of wrongdoing have lassoed the hearts of millions. When it comes to true legends, Twinkie the Kid takes the cake.
Besides our taste buds, how will our pop culture cope? We’ll always have Ghostbusters and Die Hard, but what snack cake can even hope to inspire such cinematic moments 
This is a Darth Vader moment for America. 
The End Times are near...

3 comments:

Unknown said...

Made from gas and rocks!

http://www.divinecaroline.com/22106/35281-twinkie-ingredients-revealed

GOODSTUFF said...

more stuff here -- http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151541436623677&set=a.453208868676.239413.805278676&type=1

KathyC said...

Absolutely amazing--thanks for both the history lesson and the links about the ingredients. Sigh. One less junk "product" doesn't sound all that bad. ;) ~ Blessings!